5 Simple Steps for Cathartic Writing

catharsis writing

Do you want to gain more insight into your life?

Are you looking for guidance? Do you have pent-up emotions? Are you waiting for a breakthrough?

Writing can be the key to unlocking all of this.

Writing can be an incredible tool for catharsis, which is the process of releasing or transmuting strong or repressed emotions. All you need is a pen, paper and the courage to be honest with yourself.

There are few tools that are as powerful and accessible as writing. I’ve personally had enormous breakthroughs, profound insights and mindblowing epiphanies while writing. Through writing, I’ve also been able to work through difficult emotions and find clarity in various aspects of life.

This kind of writing is an awe-inspiring combination of self-expression, therapy, creativity, meditation and spiritual connection.

It’s nothing complicated or time consuming either. All you need to do is follow these simple steps…

5 Simple Steps for Cathartic Writing

catharsis writing

1. Relax

Sit comfortably. Close your eyes. Take a few deep breaths. Let the tension evaporate out of your body and mind.

Become pure awareness.

If you have difficulty relaxing or stilling your mind, I highly recommend engaging in a regular meditation practice.

2. Tune In

After relaxing for a few seconds, you will notice things start to come back. These might be thought patterns, emotions or physical tension.

Be aware of these.

Notice your thoughts. What thoughts are circling in your mind?

Notice your emotions. What emotions are you experiencing?

Notice your body. Where are you carrying tension?

Awareness of these will act as cues for your subconscious mind to work through and transmute the disharmony associated with those thoughts, emotions and physical tension.

3. Initiate

Start writing by invoking your higher self.

Note: According to your beliefs, you can invoke whatever wisdom feels best for you; Source, God, your higher self, your subconscious mind, infinite intelligence…etc.

Here’s an example of how I initiate a cathartic writing session: “Through this pen my higher self flows.” I just write that sentence first and then let the rest of the writing flow.

4. Flow

Just write. Let it flow without resistance.

Don’t filter yourself. Let it come through however it may, without judgment. Let the words flow through you.

Keep writing for as long as you want. I usually stop after I get some sort of insight. After this, the flow tends to stop.

Feel it out for yourself. And don’t have expectations. You might not have a life changing a-ha moment every time you do this. Some of the wisdom that comes through is far more subtle.

5. The Takeaway

Write down a takeaway from what you’ve written.

This can be an affirmation or mantra to start using. It can also be something to do or an action to take.

Sometimes, in the process of writing, a clear takeaway will come though. Other times you may need to come up with a takeaway after, based on what you wrote or insights you had.

The takeaway is crucial. Because all of the insights in the world don’t mean anything if you don’t integrate and apply them.

“Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

This is a powerful process. I recommend everyone try this, even if you view yourself as someone who can’t write well

Try it out and experience the power of catharsis.

Happy writing.

– Stevie P!

PS – If you’re looking for more physical ways of facilitating catharsis, check out Primal Release.

 

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The Power of Fiction

Ralph Waldo Emerson Fiction quote

Bold statement: Fiction can be a more effective teacher than nonfiction.

The epics, the classic myths, the primordial fables, the transcendent archetypes and the phenomenon of story have all been omnipresent undertones of human culture since time immemorial.

Fiction has the unique ability in which one can use words as arrows of intention to penetrate the infinite dimensions of abstraction. In other words, truths which exist beyond the limits of our collective analytical mind are able to be conveyed through fiction, metaphor and myth.

The deepest truths are often expressed in this way. Just take a look at any sacred text or brilliant piece of poetry. If they were to be written in a strictly analytical fashion, it would be confined to a sliver of interpreted reality. But with fiction, the words conform to the unique consciousness of the reader. They act as a range of possibility to be decoded subjectively, not a rigid pillar of force-fed predeterminacy.

Literary works can cut through and transcend cultural biases and blindness, giving the reader a taste of a completely “novel” reality (see what I did there?). It allows one to see outside of the box they’ve existed in their whole life, and presents the opportunity to step outside.

Along with being a vehicle for consciousness expansion, fiction comes with a whole host of other benefits as well…

The Benefits of Reading Fiction

  • Improves brain connectivity
  • Increases empathy (and better relationships as a direct result)
  • Reduces stress
  • Enhances memory
  • Increases imagination
  • Expands vocabulary
  • Enhances creativity
  • Increases happiness
  • Enhances focus
  • Helps you be yourself (instead of conforming because the weight of social pressure is released when reading fiction)
  • Helps with approaching and overcoming obstacles (the influence of the hero’s journey)
  • Sources:
    The Surprising Power of Reading Fiction
    7 Benefits Of Reading Literary Fiction You May Not Know

    Stephen King Fiction quote

    How You Can Help Support Fiction

    Speaking of fiction, I recently launched a Kickstarter campaign for my new novel Sozwik. CLICK HERE to view the campaign and provide your support.

    Expand your mind with the wisdom of fiction, embrace the power of story and dare to dream.

    Much love.

    – Stevie P!
     

     

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    Lifting the Dead

    This post was inspired by Deadlift Essentials, a great program by my friend Isaac Payne. The deadlift is my favorite exercise (as you’ll soon find out), but it must be done properly. Isaac provides immensely helpful tips on perfecting your deadlift form. Check it out HERE. And in case you’re wondering, I have no monetary involvement with the product. I just like to support good people and good information.

    Bar_bending

    Once upon a time (at the gym)…

    The straight silver bar stared back at me. Its machine-grooved, stainless steel body beckoned my hands as it floated through the center of two vertical stacks of formidable black plates.

    There is a feeling like none other when you really that know you’re pushing your boundaries. Fear lies inside of the walls of comfort zones. And outside, is the world of unbridled exhilaration. I knew it was time for me to break on through.

    This physical embodiment of resistance lay poised before me, challenging me, while I shook the last shreds of doubt out of my body.

    I leaned down and gave a comforting rub to my right knee. It acts up occasionally. Never pain, but just a slight sensation of feeling “off.” I gave my knee the tender encouragement it needed to be up to the task.

    I then stepped to my 325 pound opponent; my 147.418 kilogram friend; my iron-constructed learning experience.

    With my feet directly below my hips, I carefully wiggled them into position. The bar became a cross-section, cutting the view of my shoes in half as I glanced down. The superimposition looked like a neutral smile, almost as if saying “Let’s see what you got.”

    Now focusing on my ankles, I subtly bounced on them, gauging their readiness. They eagerly awaited the challenge.

    Keeping my spine as straight and taut as the bar beneath me, I hinged at my hips and bent my knees. My robust hands confidently slid against the bumpy pattern. Clenching the iron, my fingers slowly closed into a vice-grip.

    The word “power” rang in my mind, as if it came from some primal part of me.

    Another subtle bounce, this time probing my entire lower body. My feet, ankles, calves, knees, thighs and hips all felt like a loaded spring. A small smirk emerged from my face.

    I tightened my grip, flexing my fully extended arms and tucked my shoulders down my posterior chain. My entire back contracted like a suit of armor.

    Inhaling deeply, I drew strength into every cell of my body.

    I braced my abdomen with tremendous force, like I was about to get shot with a cannon ball at point-blank range.

    My grip climaxed, irradiating strength through my entire body. My glutes fired, like the thrusters of a rocket ship. Blast off.

    I exhaled every ounce of fear left in my being. The bar levitated slowly off the ground. As it passed my knees, my stalwart hip-hinge exploded the weight upwards, ending with the bar kissing my upper thighs as I stood up straight.

    Every muscle in my body was contracted as I stood in mighty satisfaction, holding 325 pounds in my hands.

    “Power.” That unyielding mantra again rose to prominence in my consciousness. Energy animated my body, enlivening the totality of my existence.

    I paused, savoring the moment; admiring the magnificent strength capacity of the human body. (And to think, I would be doing this with 10 more pounds next week.)

    Then I hinged at the hip again, lowering the weight and letting the plates gently smack the hard rubber floor.

    I released my right foot from its suction-like grip and pivoted to grab my water bottle.

    As I sauntered past the plates, I lightly tapped the congregation to whisper a heart-pounding “Thank you.”


     

    PS – That’s an excerpt from my book Momentous: A Compilation of Micro Stories Acting as Glimpses of the Eternal Magic of Life’s Moments. Check that out too if you enjoyed reading this.


     

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    Creativity on Demand: How to Become an Idea Machine

    So, living up to what I wrote about in my last post, I released a new book on Amazon Kindle! It’s called 11 Steps to Become an Idea Machine. This book is seriously life-changing for anyone, especially if you’re someone who wants to transcend mediocrity and make an impact on the world. I provided a bit of a preview for you below.

    11 Steps to Become an Idea Machine (A Glimpse)

    Everything made manifest by humanity begins as an idea…

    The airplane once only existed as an image in someone’s imagination; then eventually materialized in the physical world.

    The same applies to the entire spectrum of human creativity and invention. From the wheel to paintings; from clothing to philosophies; from nuclear bombs to Pokemon. They all began as an idea.

    Ideas serve as the building blocks from which we create reality.

    Ideas are prodigiously powerful. They exist beyond time and space. Once shared, a potent idea has the ability to reshape reality as we know it. Anything and everything of the material realm is subject to the dominion of underlying ideas. 11 Steps to Become an Idea Machine provides you with a template to leverage the strength of ideas, empowering you to steer your life in whichever direction you choose.

    What is an idea machine?

    An idea machine is an individual with the ability to come up with ideas anytime, anywhere and under any circumstances. An idea machine embodies confident creativity. An idea machine is dynamic, open-minded and impeccably clever. An idea machine adds ever-increasing value to both themselves and those around them. An idea machine is remarkably generous, as hoarding ideas only blocks one’s ability to receive more.

    This book shows you, step-by-step, how to become an idea machine. Each step concludes with a challenge to help you integrate the information presented. In addition, there is a consolidated list of challenges, which serve as a simple guide for implement the steps into your daily life.

    Ideas and Action…

    There is a world of difference between the average person with one great idea who fears to pursue it, and the idea machine who chooses, out of thousands of ideas, a few to bring to fruition. The average person is stagnant, while the idea machine is dynamic. The average person is afraid to take action, while the idea machine takes action when he or she chooses to.

    If you come up with an idea you wish to pursue, then yes, you need to execute it. Action is absolutely necessary in this case (which is detailed in the bonus chapter). There is no question about that. But as you will discover, idea generation, in and of itself, comes with a plethora of pleasantly surprising benefits.

    Imagine what it’s like to always have access to an infinitely abundant stream of fresh ideas. Can you say wizardry?

    Do you want to be more creative than most people can fathom?
    Do you want to always be the most interesting person in the room?
    Do you want to provide immense value to others?
    Do you want to have more opportunities?
    Do you want to be empowered and shape your own destiny?
    Do you want to maximize your life in every way?

    Become an idea machine and join in on the fun.

    And here is a sneak peak of the actual steps:

    1. Write Everything Down (The Keystone)
    2. View the World as an Idea Playground
    3. Meditation (Master Your Mind)
    4. Maintain a Healthy Antenna
    5. Walk the Path of New Ideas
    6. Reading is Fun-(for)-da-mental
    7. Engage in Productive Solitude
    8. Shower Power
    9. Travel AKA Idea Tripping
    10. Ask Yourself…
    11. Flex Your Idea Muscle

    Click here to get your copy of “11 Steps to Become an Idea Machine” today.

     

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    Why I Write Poetry (And You Should Too)

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    Lately, I find myself with almost too much to express through words. I’ve had innumerable intuitive insights, just beyond the grasp of the mind. But instead of trying to explain these feelings of knowing in the intricate, formalized details of prose, I find myself writing poetry.

    “The desert attracts the nomad, the ocean the sailor, the infinite the poet.” – Author Unknown

    Poetry is, in my opinion, the best way of bridging the gap from the spiritual realms to physical reality. Have you ever had times when you feel something within? Something infinitely deep and profound? Not thoughts per se, but an intrinsic feeling or calling. You don’t know what it is, but you know it must be metabolized and expressed, and poetry provides the perfect outlet. Poetry is the doorway to the land of unseen mystery.

    “Poetry is the opening and closing of a door, leaving those who look through to guess about what is seen during the moment.” -Carl Sandburg

    Poetry is the plasmatic buffer zone between intellect and intuition. It is the most effective mechanism for the distillation of timeless wisdom and truth. All of the great teachers and philosophers spoke in a very poetic manner. Jesus, Buddha, Socrates, Martin Luther King Jr, John Lennon…etc. They all expressed themselves through forms of poetry. Poetry is a means of conveying the deepest of truths to people operating within the bounds of language and mind. It’s a delicate balance, describe something too much and it loses its essence. Describe something too little and it loses its capacity to be shared. That’s why poetry harbors such an alluring, mysterious beauty.

    “Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history.” – Plato

    Long, detailed explanations and lists, while being informative (on the level of the mind at least), lose the inherent nature of what is trying to be conveyed. You’re trying to convey a feeling that is beyond the mind, with the mind. It’s almost paradoxical, but that’s why poetry works so well; it’s half of the mind (logical/ rational) and half of the heart (intuitive/ beyond logic/ illogical / irrational). Poetry is an etheric sprinter, one leg – mind, one leg – heart, powerfully propelling forward. And as quick as you glimpse its magnificence, it’s over.

    “Poetry is the rhythmical creation of beauty in words.” – Edgar Allan Poe

    Poetry utilizes words, but what it describes is beyond words, beyond the mind. This is why, although it consists of words, poetry can appear illogical. It is the medium that translates the language of the heart to the language of the mind. It is a way to explain the unexplainable, without over compromising its essence. Poetry is a hint at the divine inspiration residing just beyond the grasp of the mind.

    “Reality only reveals itself when it is illuminated by a ray of poetry.” – Georges Braque

    Something like a painting can be too abstract for a message to even be conveyed. Something like detailed prose can be too rigid, too diluted by logic, that it loses its intuitive wisdom. Poetry is the bridge, linking the completely irrational heart and the completely rational mind. And that bridge is something to behold.

    “Painting is silent poetry, and poetry is painting that speaks.” – Plutarch

    Before I ruin the essence of poetry by over-describing it, here’s some quotes on poetry that I love:

    “I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled poets to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who deliver all their sublime messages without knowing in the least what they mean.” – Socrates

    “Poetry is what gets lost in translation.” – Robert Frost

    “One merit of poetry few persons will deny: it says more and in fewer words than prose.” – Voltaire

    “Language is fossil poetry.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

    “Poetry should… should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance.” – John Keats

    “Poetry is the robe, the royal apparel, in which truth asserts its divine origin.” — Beecher

    “A poet is a man who puts up a ladder to a star and climbs it while playing a violin.” – Edmond de Goncourt

    “Poetry is the journal of a sea animal living on land, wanting to fly in the air.” ― Carl Sandburg

    Make your life a brilliant work of poetry.

    -Stevie P!