1

Two Types of Routines

“Routines make up our day, so make ones that will only help you.”2 Meal Mike

In my opinion, there are two types of routines. The first is what I call complacency routines. These are based in fear, monotony, and, well…complacency. The second type is goal-oriented routines. These correlate with desire, change, and achievement.

I was also going to add a third category regarding things you “have to do.” But, on a fundamental level, do we really have to do anything?

It’s all our choice. Kinda empowering, right?

Let’s break down these routines.

Complacency routines:

  • Fear-based. Fear of change. Fear of the unknown. Fear of failing.
  • Apathy
  • Laziness
  • Resistance to change
  • Associated with an uneventful, monotonous lifestyle

Example: Getting home from work and watching the same tv show every night. (Oh yeeeah, livin the dream)

Goal-oriented routines:

  • Desire-based
  • Used to achieve/improve something
  • Stimulates (hopefully positive) change

Example: A workout routine.

What we can take away from this is a bit (or a lot) of self-awareness. Life is in our control when we are conscious of our thoughts, emotions, and actions (routines). Once we are aware, we will come to the realization that we have the power of choice. We will consciously choose to get that mid-afternoon coffee (or not), instead of just doing it without thinking. This will naturally result in adding more goal-oriented routines to our lives, while minimizing the complacency routines.

If we become conscious of our routines (and what types they are), we will no longer coast through life as an automaton. There is no regular day. Every day is special. Every day is a miracle. Every day is precious. Every day is to be savored. We must remember that, and keep working towards living out our dreams.

16

A Hidden Benefit of Social Media

Everyone is talking about how social media is changing the world. It most definitely is, and one aspect that has been under-discussed is what it does at a personal level.

Social media is an incentive to be awesome.

Provocation to do more cool things, be more interesting, and share useful information.

^My cover photo on tha Facebookz

Doing awesome things:

Social media can be viewed as a call to action. What are you going to post about if you sit around all day on the internet, playing video games, or watching tv? Go do something epic, then share it. Then people will appreciate what you have to contribute.

We all want to share great experiences, and social media is the perfect platform for it. Plus, to some extent, we all want to look cool, right?

Being awesome:

Social media is encouragement to be more interesting. To share useful information. To spread a positive message. To help others. To make people (and yourself) laugh. It’s a digital platform for you to express yourself and share your gifts.

And it also forces you to become more self-aware. Because everything is so transparent, you want to become the best version of yourself, and have your internet personality reflect that. Think about it this way. Who wants to read anything that a Negative Nancy posts? Not me, I’ll hit em with the unfriend button quicker than a squirrel video on fast forward.

So what it all comes down to is this…

You need to get up, get out and get somethin’, don’t let the days of your life pass by.

 

4

Everything is Interconnected

Our reality is an invisible web. A pull on one place carries a subtle vibration to another; to all others.

Everything is like a ripple on the surface of a pond. Ripples might originate from different places, but they spread everywhere.

Nothing is completely independent of everything.

Every action spurs a chain of events.

Reality is a snowball effect.

One snowflake has the potential to initiate an avalanche.

One domino has the potential to knock down the rest.

Any light eliminates all darkness.

A thought becomes reality.

Positive intentions bring about positive circumstances.

Good habits improve other (seemingly unrelated) aspects of life.

Helping others creates a “pay it forward” snowball effect.

We have more power and influence than we’re conditioned to think. Use it wisely.

Feel good, feel great, and spread it around like peanut butter.

P!

3

9 Words, 90% of Your Health and Body Composition Goals

9 Words, 90% of Your Health and Body Composition Goals…

-Eat real, unprocessed foods
-Exercise according to your goals

Whoomp! There it is.

That’s it. That’s what it all comes down to. The basis for everything health and body composition related.

“Knowledge is a process of piling up facts; wisdom lies in their simplification.” -Martin Henry Fischer

Here’s a little elaboration celebration…

These days, people are plagued with “paralysis by analysis.” There is an overwhelming amount of information out there. And instead of sticking to the basics and working consistently, people sit there and debate what the best methods are (without actually doing anything). Keep it simple, take action, and be consistent. It’s really a lot less complicated than everyone makes it out to be.

What do I mean by real, unprocessed foods?

Fruits, vegetables, animals, fish, plant, seeds, nuts…etc. Foods that, you know, naturally occur on Earth. Have you ever seen a pop-tart tree?

A “Paleo template” should, ideally, be the foundation of everyone’s eating habits. Notice I use the words “template” and “foundation”, because the last thing we need is to impose any more rigid rules/systems on ourselves.

Another way to look at it is if a food only has one ingredient (which is THAT food), it’s probably good for you.

In the word of the late, great Jack Lalane, “If man made it, don’t eat it.”

And with that being said, I think the 80/20 principle works well with what you eat. If you eat real food 80% of the time, you’ll be alright. No need to be fanatical and deprive yourself of ice cream for all eternity. Where’s the fun in that?

Exercise:

This should be a combination of low-intensity exercise (think walking), and short, high-intensity exercise (sprinting, resistance training…etc). Not those, long, drawn out jogging sessions. Why? Because that’s what’s most effective, and it’s how we’re meant to move. We evolved to walk all day, and occasionally sprint or lift something heavy (including our bodies). Mark Scisson summarizes this beautifully in this article.

The Final 10%: (Tailored to your specific goal)
The methods will obviously vary depending on what someone is trying to achieve. For the final 10%, you need more specific and advanced methods tailored to your specific goal(s). The final 10% for a 60 year-old trying to get off cholesterol meds will vary greatly from a 20 year old wanting to pack on muscle.

This is where all of those *insert superlative* dietary and training techniques come into play. Carb cycling, intermittent fasting, progressive overload, 5×5 lifting…etc. These will all help you achieve that final 10%, assuming you choose one that aligns with your goals.

More food for thought:
If you want to do something like get really lean (<8% bodyfat), or pack on 50lbs of muscle, it’s slightly unnatural. And this means you will have to do slightly unnatural things to get there. Remember that. You still need have that foundation of eating real, unprocessed foods and exercising according to your goals (not jogging, don’t be a hamster). And that final 10% is up to you.

The Deathbed Question

Ok, the title seems a bit morbid, but we’re going in the opposite direction here. The + side of the battery, if you will.

When evaluating the “life importance” of an activity, ask yourself, “If I was on my deathbed, would I wish I had done more of it?”

This will allow you to truly prioritize everything in life, and put things into perspective.

Think about how ludicrous it would be for someone to say “I wish I had spent more time at work” on their deathbed. Or “I wish I did a little more binge drinking.”

“At least three times every day take a moment and ask yourself what is really important. Have the wisdom and courage to build your life around your answer.” -Lee Jampolsky

Here are the things that are the most important to me: (in no particular order)

  • Personal growth/improvement
  • Spiritual growth
  • Health
  • Fitness/Exercising
  • Family
  • Good friends
  • Connecting with people
  • Love in various forms (family, friends, intimate relationships)
  • Helping people
  • Life experiences
  • Acquiring skills
  • Gaining knowledge and wisdom (reading, learning, applying)
  • Having fun
  • Laughing
  • Creating memories
  • Having ways to express myself
  • Leaving a legacy
  • Travel/Exploring new places

These are my priorities. The things I need to spend time and energy on if I want to continue to be happy, achieve my goals, and live without regrets. Notice how there are no material things here. And even though some of these might cost money (travel), the vast majority are absolutely free. What does that tell you? We don’t really need all the stuff that we think we need. And it ties back to my possessions vs experiences post.

What’s really important to you? Ask yourself that. It could take you from simply existing, to truly living, with no regrets.

3 Simple Ways to Get Through One of Those Work Days

We all have those days. Those days at work when the hours seem to drag…on…by…way…too…slowly.

Here’s 3 simple strategies (that I personally use) to go from 0 to awesome when that feeling hits:

Whatever you’re doing, think of it as a challenge.
Make a game out of it. Trust me, this makes everything (including life in general) easier and more enjoyable.

Have something to look forward to (no matter how small), and take breaks.
Go out for lunch. Take a walk outside. Go get a cup of water from the kitchen. Do something you love after work. Plan an awesome, healthy dinner for later. Remember, this too shall pass.

Laugh.
Laugh with coworkers. Laugh with yourself. Call someone up and share a laugh. Find a reason to laugh for no reason at all. Laughter truly is the best medicine.

Apply these simple strategies on those dragging days and it’ll be (the proverbial) 5 o’clock before you know it.

1

Don’t Categorize Yourself

Don’t put yourself in a box.

Every time you categorize yourself, you pigeonhole yourself. It’s self-imposed limitation, robbing yourself of infinite potential. Why do I have to be an American? Why not simply a human being? Or, better yet, why can’t I just BE?

If you categorize yourself as a nerd, are you going to strive to develop a strong, healthy body that is a positive reflection of yourself? Most likely not. I’m not saying it isn’t possible, but that rigid classification of nerd will consciously and/or subconsciously make you gravitate away from things like health and fitness. Because that’s not what nerds do.

If you categorize yourself as a Christian, are you going to immerse yourself in topics that aren’t aligned with Christian views? Are you going to befriend people of other religions as readily as you would befriend Christians? Most likely not.

“Absorb what is useful, reject what is useless, add what is essentially your own.” -Bruce Lee

Why do we categorize ourselves?
Because we feel comfortable associating with groups, with attaching our name to something. It’s easier to fit in than to stand out. We’re conditioned to follow, and therefore, not completely trust in ourselves. We need to wake up and realize our full potential.

Also, society (or the elite who control society) keep us focused on our differences: (seen at the Sons of Liberty Academy)
-Race
-Religion
-Political Parties
-Languages
-Ethnic Background
-Social Status
-Income
-Education

This sets the scene for the ol’ divide and conquer scheme. By labeling ourselves, we essentially give up our power.

“We have to stop thinking in black and white and soften our rigid belief systems. This world is not black and white. Nothing is. If you have a rigid belief system that is not open to the endless subtleties of life, you become a manipulator’s party trick.” -David Icke

Categorizing yourself as a person blocks you off from infinite possibility. It is a form of attachment. A product of the ego.

What are some benefits of not categorizing ourselves?

  • The ability to draw information/experience from various diverse sources
  • The ability to form our own conclusions
  • The ability to relate to everyone and everything
  • Having an unbiased perspective
  • Building our own views, beliefs, and theories
  • Gaining a sense of power and genuine confidence
  • Not being easily manipulated
  • Eliminating limitations
  • Opening up to the world of infinite possibilities

Would you rather access one website, or the whole internet?

Would you rather be confined to an apartment, or have the freedom to explore the world around you?

Live without limits.

Don’t put yourself in a box.

*Notice that this post is in the “Uncategorized” category haha

UPDATE (10/6/2012):

I just came across this excerpt that is oh so relevant to this post.

“When people begin to soften their inflexible thoughts and responses, the influence the daily programming has upon them is diffused also. They begin to see the subtleties of mind manipulation in a way a rigid mind cannot. This mental switch is open to everyone, no matter how unyielding their minds might be now. It can happen in an instant, once you decide you want it to happen. Scanning the information and the views available to us and picking out those aspects which we each feel good about involves taking pieces from everywhere and fitting them together to form our own evolving truth. When we are asked to put a label on what we think and believe in these circumstances, we cannot answer. We are not ‘Left’, nor ‘Right’, nor ‘Centre’. We are not a ‘religion’. We just are. There are no instant labels for that. There are no labels at all. We refuse to be pigeon-holed because we are constantly seeking and evolving. If people can name an “ism” of any kind to describe what they believe, they are in some form of mental prison. The difference it makes when you let go of the labels and the off-the-peg opinions and views promoted by the “isms” is beyond words. You see the world so much more clearly. The smokescreens begin to disperse.”
-David Icke (And the Truth Shall Set You Free)

Starting the Day Off Right

How many of us enthusiastically jump out of bed in the morning, ready to attack our day?

…Yeah, me neither. It’s a tough transition from the comfort of your bed to the cold void of darkness beyond it, but it’s gotta happen at some point.

“If you’re bored with life – you don’t get up every morning with a burning desire to do things – you don’t have enough goals.” -Lou Holtz

It’s crucial to establish a morning routine to start fresh, clear the mind, and shake out the cobwebs in the body. We need to wake up and prepare both the mind and body for the upcoming day. I’ve been doing what is called a Bio-Energizer Warm Up (brainchild of Elliot Hulse) every morning for the last week. It’s the very first thing I do after getting out of bed, and it has me feeling like Superman sippin’ Starbucks before I even step in the shower.

This pretty much sums it up:

Before

After

 

Watch Elliot demonstrating the Bio-Energizer Warm Up below…

There’s an article for it too, which you can read HERE

What are the benefits of having a morning routine like this:

  • Releasing tension- I find that the tension in my body is directly correlated with the tension in my mind. When one is tense, more often than not, the other is tense as well. So this is a great way to remove tension from both the body and mind. And there’s a whole host of benefits to releasing tension, which could be an article in and of itself.
  • Preparing the body and mind for the day- Clear mind, energized body. When I do the Bio-Energizer Warm Up, I feel a positive vibrational energy afterwards. The last exercise (Ground Pound) has a lot to do with this, and it’s a great feeling.
  • You get more excited for the day (even if it’s just a regular day at the office)
  • Improves mobility
  • Enhances recovery from strenuous exercise
  • It’s a form of dynamic meditation
  • Helps you to get ready faster (I can be a slow-motion-take-15-minutes-to-put-on-a-sock-zombie in the morning, and this speeds me up)
  • Makes a cold shower slightly less traumatizing afterward

Try it out, and let me know how it works for you.

161

Possessions vs Experiences: Straight From the Horse’s Mouth

I recently found this article on Quora, and it really piqued my interest. I’ve always had the opinion that spending money on experiences is far more rewarding than accumulating material goods, and this (supposed) billionaire has reinforced this in his answer to an almost unrelated question.

The question is “What does it feel like to be a self-made millionaire under the age of 25?”

And here’s the answer that caught my attention: (Note: I bolded my favorite sections)

“I’ve been featured on the homepage of Yahoo! as a millionaire, offered 3 separate reality TV shows – including that terrible Millionaire Dating one on Bravo. I bought a luxury car with cash on my 16th birthday, owned a house a few years later.

Hitting $1m was a non-event, I don’t even know the exact date it happened. The dividends just all of a sudden added up, and it was there. I celebrated by buying myself a used Rolex. A few years later I also did a vacation where I “tried to spend as much money as possible” – but I still found myself gravitating towards “values” on the wine list rather than blowing it all out by spending thousands on a bottle, which I thought was silly.

Hitting 8-figures was a bit more substantial, I knew it meant I’d never, ever have to work again unless something went terribly wrong. The closing call with the law firm was one of the biggest anti-climaxes of my life. I had already “owned” the money in my head years before hand, so seeing it crystallize on my bank statement didn’t make a huge difference, except that it freed me up to start tackling bucket-list items.

I had been postponing so many experiences with the idea of “doing it at some point in the future when I made it” that I just started tackling them one by one. Superbowl. Sundance. SobeFest. Africa. A month around Europe. 3-Star Michelin dining.

The only “awkward” thing I keep running into repeatedly, is other people’s comments about wealth or money. Whether it’s a tour guide pointing out a hotel that costs $1000/night and everybody in the tour bus gasps (and it’s where I’m staying) or taxi drivers making snarky comments about millionaires, or people suggesting it’s my “lucky day and I should buy a lotto ticket” – I run into it repeatedly and predictably, but I always tend to keep my mouth shut and not say anything.

Along the way, the most interesting phenomenon has been “adaptation”. Moving from a $300K apartment to a $1m one barely made a difference after the first month.

Jumping from that to something 60% bigger, and oceanfront (on the beach) that was worth over $2m barely made a blip after the first few weeks.

Buying a fancy, fast sports car – yes, I did it, but again people tend to massively overestimate the “joy” or “happiness” that a particular item will give them vs. reality. After a few weeks, it just sits there. The anticipation, wait and planning is almost better than the realization of the event itself.

When they say “it’s all about the journey, rather than the destination” that’s absolutely true. The part that I’ve most enjoyed is hanging out, meeting and become friends with amazing, successful, smart and ambitious entrepreneurs. It’s inspiring, invigorating, and just plain fun. 

I still don’t have a private plane or NetJets card, I fly economy-class around North America most of the time, I don’t even have a maid to do my cleaning. I prefer to buy clothes when they go on sale, and I cringe at people who waste thousands on Gucci-this or Prada-that. I upgrade my MacBook every few years, not every model. I still use an original iPad. I’ve never bought a new car (except for my parents). The biggest TV in my apartment is 42″.

Experiences, even when they cost thousands of dollars a day, so far have been my best investments. I’ve stopped postponing as much as I used to. The best time is “now”, but to be honest, I could have done many of these things much earlier, and on a lower-budget, and probably still had a great time.

Try this as a test–

Make a list of all physical things you would buy if you had $10 million. Let your mind roam free. Don’t limit yourself to the reasonable.

It’s not that long, is it?

And if you worked a decade, or more to earn that money, you’d cross 90% off the items off that list anyway. There’s amazingly few physical things that are worth spending money off once you’ve covered the basics. If I gave you $100K in cash and told you to spend it in a day, you’d be hard pressed unless you bought jewellery, or a car.

Gadgets? Clothes? A bigger TV? Unless money fell from the sky into your lap, you’re probably going to be quite pragmatic about what you invest in. There’s a reason why most lottery winners end up bankrupt within a few years.

The utility of money once you get past a certain threshold is very limited. And I honestly think that most people who want to be “rich” don’t really mean it. What they are really saying is that they’d like someone to hand them a check.

But when push comes to shove, and there’s hard work, sacrifices, and tears involved, they’d rather spend 4-hours a day watching TV along with the rest of America.”